Tuesday, December 5, 2017

Do You or Someone You Know Have Diabetes (or Pre-Diabetic)


This is Dr. andy Galpin on episode #229 of Mark Bell's PowerCast .... "More than 100 million U.S. adults are now living with diabetes or prediabetes, according to a new report released today by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The report finds that as of 2015, 30.3 million Americans – 9.4 percent of the U.S. population –have diabetes.Jul 18, 2017"... There is something we can do...







DID YOU HEAR THAT????

So let's start at the beginning 

There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. Both types of diabetes are chronic diseases that affect the way your body regulates blood sugar, or glucose. Glucose is the fuel that feeds your body’s cells, but to enter your cells it needs a key. Insulin is that key.
People with type 1 diabetes don’t produce insulin. You can think of it as not having a key.
People with type 2 diabetes don’t respond to insulin as well as they should and later in the disease often don’t make enough insulin. You can think of this as having a broken key.
Both types of diabetes can lead to chronically high blood sugar levels. That increases the risk of diabetes complications.

EXERCISE WILL HELP BOTH!


How common is diabetes?
Type 2 diabetes is much more common that type 1. According to the 2017 National Diabetes Statistics Report, there are 30.3 million people in the United States with diabetes. That’s close to 1 in 10 people. Among all these people living with diabetes, 90 to 95 percent have type 2 diabetes.

The percentage of people with diabetes increases with age. Less than 10 percent of the general population has diabetes, but among those 65 and older, the incidence rate reaches a high of 25.2 percent. Only about 0.18 percent of children under the age of 18 had diabetes in 2015.

Men and women get diabetes at roughly the same rate, but incidence rates are higher among certain races and ethnicities. American Indians and Alaskan Natives have the highest prevalence of diabetes among both men and women. The black and Hispanic populations have higher rates of diabetes than non-Hispanic whites.

There’s no cure for type 1 diabetes. People with type 1 diabetes don’t produce insulin, so it must be regularly injected into your body
Blood sugar testing is an essential part of managing type 1 diabetes, because levels can go up and down quickly.

Type 2 diabetes can be controlled and even reversed with diet and exercise alone, but many people need extra support.

Are You or Someone You Know is this position...Type 2 Diabetes or Pre Diabetic?

Do you live in South Florida, in the Miami Lakes, Hialeah, Hialeah Gardens Area?

Let's Get You Moving and Eating Better!!

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